The Great Dane Club of America Great Dane Illustrated Standard page four
 
The Great Dane Illustrated Standard part four
Forequaters and hindquarters

AKC Standard

Forequarters - The forequarters, viewed from the side, shall be strong and muscular. The shoulder blade must be strong and sloping, forming, as near as possible, a right angle in its articulation with the upper arm. A line from the upper tip of the shoulder to the back of the elbow joint should be perpendicular. The ligaments and muscles holding the shoulder blade to the rib cage must be well developed, firm and securely attached to prevent loose shoulders. The shoulder blade and the upper arm should be the same length. The elbow should be one-half the distance from the withers to the ground. The strong pasterns should slope slightly. The feet should be round and compact with well-arched toes, neither toeing in, toeing out, nor rolling to the inside or outside. The nails should be short, strong and as dark as possible, except that they may be lighter in harlequins. Dewclaws may or may not be removed.

Discussion

The greatest amount of work in supporting the dog falls to the forequarters, which carries the body's weight during stride, absorbs the weight as the step is completed, and provides directional thrust. Correct placement and angulation of shoulder and forearm give the dog greater reach, and the slightly sloping pastern and well cushioned pads absorb the shock as the foot hits the ground.

Great Dane Scapula

Great Dane Scapula

Great Dane Front

Great Dane Feet

Great Dane Feet


AKC Standard

Hindquarters - The hindquarters shall be strong, broad, muscular and well angulated, with well let down hocks. Seen from the rear, the hock joints appear to be perfectly straight, turned neither toward the inside nor toward the outside. The rear feet should be round and compact, with well-arched toes, neither toeing in nor out. The nails should be short, strong and as dark as possible, except they may be lighter in harlequins. Wolf claws are a serious fault.

Discussion

Strength and power must also be embodied in the rear assembly which supplies the drive to force the body forward. The set of the croup combined with the angulation of the upper and lower thighs provide the leverage to transmit the maximum power. The work required of the hindquarters requires strongly muscled upper and lower thighs, strong parallel hocks and the same degree of angulation to balance that of the forequarters. A steep croup, lack of rear angulation or over-angulation of the rear are all deviations from the Standard and should be penalized to the extent of the deviation.

Great Dane Rear

Ideal Angulation

Good Great Dane Angles

Angulation Deviations

Bad Great Dane Angles

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